Category Archives: Event

Faculty to present at 2017 Atlantic Teaching Showcase

Teaching award winner David Wilson will be sharing some of his best ideas at the 2017 Teaching Showcase, to be held at the Mount on Saturday, October 14. Professor Wilson will be presenting in what is known as the “Furious Fives” session — a quick series of five-minute talks packed with ideas to take away from the conference. David Wilson offers this summary of his talk:

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https://i0.wp.com/www.msvu.ca/site/media/msvu/davidwilson.JPG

David Wilson, recipient of the 2017 MSVU Part-time Teaching Award

Does your class often end with a fade to black?

Rather than merely telling students during the last 5 minutes of a class what will happen in the next one, a more effective teaching practice is showing them. This “Furious Five” session will quickly demonstrate tips on how to briefly preview (and promote) a topic during the closing moments of a class that bridges what students have just learned, so that they will be curious and look forward to learning more in the next class. The final five minutes of a class can serve as a memorable pivot point that keeps students motivated. The key to accomplishing this goal is to capture students’ attention. Moreover, the best way to make these connections between classes is by using a lively activity that encourages participation. Thus, attendees at this session can expect to be involved in the fun.

 

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The experiential learning opportunities offered by our department will be on display during the conference as well.  Dr. Anna Smol will be organizing a display that features the English Department’s many hands-on learning activities, from participation at the Atlantic Undergraduate English Conference, to part-time jobs as writing tutors and research assistants, to the many course-related activities that our students engage in.

David Wilson‘s talk will be given on Saturday, October 14 in a session scheduled from  4:25 to 4:50 in McCain 105.

Anna Smol‘s experiential learning display will be in the Rosaria Terrace from 11:30 to 1:30.

The Saturday Teaching Showcase conference is part of a three-day series of events. On Thursday night at 7 p.m. a public lecture by special guest and keynote speaker James Lang, author of Small Teaching and Cheating Lessons, will take place in the Rosaria Multipurpose Room. A workshop with Dr. Lang will be held on Friday morning before the Showcase takes place on Saturday.  For details, including the schedule, see more information here.

 

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Alan Syliboy visit, October 10

The English Department is pleased to present Alan Syliboy, author and illustrator of The Thundermaker. Dr. Syliboy is an internationally renowned Mi’kmaw painter, sculptor, filmmaker, musician, and social justice activist.

Tuesday, October 10
Noon
MSVU Aboriginal Student Centre

You can take a look at Syliboy’s art and listen to his music on his website: alansyliboy.ca, which also links to his Facebook page. You can also find him on Twitter, @AlanSyliboy, where you can see a daily sample of his artwork.  This image, posted on October 3, comes from his drum series:

Alan Syliboy, drum series. posted on Oct. 3, 2017 @AlanSyliboy

Drum Series, from @AlanSyliboy, posted October 3, 2017.

 

 

Dr Fraser to speak at Research Remixed

Dr. Graham Fraser will be one of the speakers at the Mount’s annual Research Remixed event on Tuesday, October 3rd. His talk is scheduled for 11:15 in the Multi-Purpose Room in Rosaria.  Here’s a preview of what he’ll be talking about:

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Virginia Woolf, Spectro-Modernism, and the Afterlife of Things

Dr. Graham Fraser
Tuesday, October 3, 11:15 a.m.
Multi-Purpose Room, Rosaria

“Think of a kitchen table, when you’re not there” challenges Andrew Ramsay in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, distilling his father’s empiricist philosophy. Woolf’s writings are fascinated by the world of objects removed from human perception or context – objects that are abandoned, disused, broken. Yet Woolf’s own attention to inanimate (yet lively) objects is so exquisite that Michel Serres can write that in her work, “inanimate objects have a soul.” This presentation will discuss how my work traces the progress of these inanimate souls from their domestic lives in human service, through their abandonment and decay, and finally into their afterlives as ghostly, illegible debris.

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Dr. Graham Fraser

Dr. Graham Fraser

You can read more about Dr. Fraser’s research here.

Research Remixed brings together researchers from across the university who present their work in short talks or posters. The event starts at 9 a.m. and goes until 1 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room in Rosaria.  All are welcome to drop in during the day.  You can download the full Research Remixed schedule here.

 

 

Dr Green on war and peace in art

Community Stories of War and Peace public lecture series

Dr. Reina Green, along with local artist Jessica L. Wiebe, will be speaking about representations of war and peace in art on Friday, September 29, at 1:30 in the Keshen Goodman Library.  Her talk is part of a series of Friday presentations organized by the Mount Network for Community-Engaged Research on War (NCERW) in collaboration with other community groups.

Dr. Reina Green

Dr. Reina Green

You can read more about Dr. Green’s research here.

The Network for Community-Engaged Research on War is interested in “exploring what stories of war and peace are being told, identifying which stories are more visible and which are marginalized, and understanding how war affects us in diverse and overlapping ways.”

All of the talks take place from 1:30 – 2:30 in the Keshen Goodman Public Library, 330 Lacewood Drive, Halifax. Other topics to be presented include military families, peace perspectives, refugee experiences, and the Halifax Explosion. For more details about future talks, please see the Community Stories poster [pdf 3.9 MB].

keshen-sponsors

 

Meet & Greet Monday Sept. 25

Please join us for the Mount English Meet and Greet!

  • Discover who we are and what we do.
  • Meet other English and Writing students.
  • Get to know the professors.
  • Learn about our programs.
  • Meet special guest, El Jones, poet, activist, and Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies.
  • Hear about upcoming events.

Refreshments will be served.

Current students and alumnae are invited!

Monday, September 25
4:30 – 6:00
Seton 404

 

Congratulations to our high school essay contest winners!

This year, our Department organized a Grade 11 and 12 English Essay Writing Competition, and now we are pleased to announce the results.

Jack Farrell, winner of the 2017 High School Essay Writing Competition

Jack Farrell, winner of the 2017 MSVU English Essay Writing Competition, with English Department Chair Dr. Reina Green (left), and Dr. Janet Friesen (right), Halifax Grammar School

First prize:

Jack Farrell, Halifax Grammar School, “Creon as a Warning of Autocracy”

Honourable Mention:

Ciara Harris, J.L. Ilsley High School, “Contrasting Literary Styles in Fahrenheit 451 and Animal Farm

Ruining Zhang, Sacred Heart School of Halifax, “Sweet Potato Nostalgia”

Evelyn Cormier, Halifax West High School, “The Birth and Destruction of Honour”

Jack Farrell won an iPad Mini as the first prize, while the writers who received an honourable mention were awarded gift certificates to a local bookstore.

The Mount English Department is pleased to highlight the work of young writers, from high school through university and beyond. We look forward to seeing participating students, their parents, and teachers at a reception in the fall.


English at the Mount

Our English courses feature small classes where students have plenty of opportunities to write with feedback from their professors, while our unique Writing Minor focuses not only on creative writing, but also on rhetoric, editing, and writing in various genres.

 

 

New Course Descriptions 2017-18

booklet launch 2017The new English and Writing course descriptions for 2017-2018 are now available! Our course booklet launch is on right now until 2 p.m. today.  Come to the fifth floor of Seton in the English Corner and grab a coffee and a booklet. Faculty advisors are standing by to help.

You can also find the course descriptions on our English Department website — click on “Course Guide 2017-18.”  Unfortunately, the website doesn’t come with snacks.

Poetry Reading: Brian Bartlett

Poetry Reading / Q&A:  Poetry & Process

Brian Bartlett

MacDonald Room Reading Series 2017

All welcome. Open to the public. Free

Brian Bartlett Wanting the DayBrian Bartlett has published 7 collections of poetry, including The Watchmaker’s Table and The Afterlife of Trees, as well as a book of prose, Ringing Here & There: A Natural Calendar; he has twice won The Malahat Review Long Poem prize. He is currently editing the collected poems of Alden Nowlan with 3 new books forthcoming, including a second book of nature writing (from Gaspereau Press).

“reflective precision” . . . “a passionate worldview & joy in language”
(Canadian Literature; Arc)

Monday March 6
7:30 p.m.
Mount Saint Vincent University Library
EMF Centre, Main Floor
166 Bedford Highway

Campus map

poster [pdf]

Hands-on Research by English Honours Students

Our English Honours students have a rare opportunity to spend a year researching and writing in the manner of professional literary critics and theorists. Under the supervision of a professor, they select a topic, develop it through research, and write a substantial scholarly work. Last week, our current Honours students presented their research to the department in our annual Honours Colloquium.

Meet our 2016-17 Honours students:

Kyle Cross

Kyle Cross Honours 2016-17

My thesis explores John Gardner’s novel Grendel, which is an adaptation of Beowulf told from the monster’s perspective.  In my project, I employ postcolonial theory — mainly the theories of Edward Said and Homi K. Bhabha — to explore the ways in which Gardner portrays the relationship between the monster and the Danes.

Allyson Roussy

Allyson Roussy Honours 2016-17

With a focus on children’s literature, I am examining how structures of surveillance, specifically the panoptical structure, are used for the social conditioning and social control of children. I will be working with Mary Martha Sherwood’s The Fairchild Family, Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons, Elizabeth George Speare’s The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and Madeline L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

Alexandra Rudderham

Alexandra Rudderham Honours 2016-17

My thesis focuses exclusively on novels and short stories by Thomas King. A self-described “contemporary Native writer,” King blends written narratives with oral traditions. I am interested in his specific brand of interfusional storytelling: King creates an intentionally liminal space and deconstructs assumptions about the way stories are told and perceived. The novel Green Grass, Running Water, short stories “One Good Story, That One” and “Coyote Goes West” are a few of the texts I use to explore King’s methods of replicating the spoken voice through written narrative. In my research, I am considering authority and a possible capital-T “Truth” in storytelling.

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If you’re a Mount English student and think you might be interested in an Honours degree, speak to your faculty advisor or the Department Chair. You can find some information about our Honours program on our Course Guide webpage.