Category Archives: Event

New Course Descriptions 2017-18

booklet launch 2017The new English and Writing course descriptions for 2017-2018 are now available! Our course booklet launch is on right now until 2 p.m. today.  Come to the fifth floor of Seton in the English Corner and grab a coffee and a booklet. Faculty advisors are standing by to help.

You can also find the course descriptions on our English Department website — click on “Course Guide 2017-18.”  Unfortunately, the website doesn’t come with snacks.

Poetry Reading: Brian Bartlett

Poetry Reading / Q&A:  Poetry & Process

Brian Bartlett

MacDonald Room Reading Series 2017

All welcome. Open to the public. Free

Brian Bartlett Wanting the DayBrian Bartlett has published 7 collections of poetry, including The Watchmaker’s Table and The Afterlife of Trees, as well as a book of prose, Ringing Here & There: A Natural Calendar; he has twice won The Malahat Review Long Poem prize. He is currently editing the collected poems of Alden Nowlan with 3 new books forthcoming, including a second book of nature writing (from Gaspereau Press).

“reflective precision” . . . “a passionate worldview & joy in language”
(Canadian Literature; Arc)

Monday March 6
7:30 p.m.
Mount Saint Vincent University Library
EMF Centre, Main Floor
166 Bedford Highway

Campus map

poster [pdf]

Hands-on Research by English Honours Students

Our English Honours students have a rare opportunity to spend a year researching and writing in the manner of professional literary critics and theorists. Under the supervision of a professor, they select a topic, develop it through research, and write a substantial scholarly work. Last week, our current Honours students presented their research to the department in our annual Honours Colloquium.

Meet our 2016-17 Honours students:

Kyle Cross

Kyle Cross Honours 2016-17

My thesis explores John Gardner’s novel Grendel, which is an adaptation of Beowulf told from the monster’s perspective.  In my project, I employ postcolonial theory — mainly the theories of Edward Said and Homi K. Bhabha — to explore the ways in which Gardner portrays the relationship between the monster and the Danes.

Allyson Roussy

Allyson Roussy Honours 2016-17

With a focus on children’s literature, I am examining how structures of surveillance, specifically the panoptical structure, are used for the social conditioning and social control of children. I will be working with Mary Martha Sherwood’s The Fairchild Family, Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons, Elizabeth George Speare’s The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and Madeline L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

Alexandra Rudderham

Alexandra Rudderham Honours 2016-17

My thesis focuses exclusively on novels and short stories by Thomas King. A self-described “contemporary Native writer,” King blends written narratives with oral traditions. I am interested in his specific brand of interfusional storytelling: King creates an intentionally liminal space and deconstructs assumptions about the way stories are told and perceived. The novel Green Grass, Running Water, short stories “One Good Story, That One” and “Coyote Goes West” are a few of the texts I use to explore King’s methods of replicating the spoken voice through written narrative. In my research, I am considering authority and a possible capital-T “Truth” in storytelling.

*****

If you’re a Mount English student and think you might be interested in an Honours degree, speak to your faculty advisor or the Department Chair. You can find some information about our Honours program on our Course Guide webpage.

Halifax Poet Laureate Rebecca Thomas at the Mount

Halifax Poet Laureate
Rebecca Thomas

Public Performance

Halifax Poet Laureate Rebecca Thomas

photo credit Javian Trotman

Wednesday, February 8, 2017, noon
MSVU Faculty Lounge Seton 404-405

Hosted by the Departments of English, History, Sociology and Anthropology, Women’s Studies,  and the Cultural Studies programme

Everyone welcome!

Bad Poetry Reading 2017

Bad poetry reading 2017

Lighten the winter blues and come to the
English Society Meet and Greet
and
Bad Poetry Reading
not your usual finger-snapping poetry evening
Wednesday, January 18
Seton 404
4:30

All welcome

The English Department began hosting an annual evening of bad poetry, organized by Dr. Chris Ferns, thirty years ago. It has become a much anticipated evening full of laughter at the expense of some of our most famous poets who have written some of the most dreadful poetry.

Come and join us to hear such classics as the “Ode on the Mammoth Cheese,” “The Mongrel,” and “The Bells,” the latter complete with a memorable chorus. Participation is also encouraged. If you would like to read a poem, let us know, and we will find one for you.

 

 

Farewell gathering for Dr. Susan Drain

Dr. Susan Drain

The English Department invites the Mount community to a farewell gathering for Dr. Susan Drain. Susan will give a short presentation, “The Great War Writ Small: the soldier, the scholar and the wordpress,” on editing and publishing the papers of Percy Theobald, a gunner in WWI. She notes that this project brings together everything she has learned in her eclectic academic career.

Thursday, December 15
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
McCain 105

You can find Dr. Drain’s blog, Percy’s War, here.

English Department research on display at Research Remixed

Research Remixed 2016The Mount’s annual research day will be held on Tuesday, November 15th in the Rosaria Multipurpose Room from 9:15 to 2:30. The day features short talks, posters, and booths displaying the research of Mount faculty and students across numerous disciplines. Everyone is invited to drop in, have some refreshments, and survey some of the work that goes on in our university.

A couple of English faculty and a former student will be participating. At 12:45, you can listen to Dr. Diane Piccitto‘s talk on “Reconsidering Heroism in William Blake’s Epic Poem, Milton.”  Dr. Anna Smol and Rebecca Power (B.A.Hons 2015) will be presenting a poster on “Adaptation as Analysis: Creative Work in a Literature Course,” which is based on their forthcoming essays in the book, Fandom in the Classroom (U of Iowa Press). The poster features some of the creative work done by students in ENGL 4475, Studies in Medievalism: Tolkien and Myth-making. (Poster presentations run from 9:45 – 10:55 and 1:15 to 2:30).

The event begins at 9:15 with an opening and drumming by the Mount’s Nancy’s Chair, Catherine Martin. You can find the complete schedule here: research-remixed-schedule-2016 [pdf]

Jenny Davison. Sculpture of Doors of Durin. ENGL 4475 projectTake a look at the research that led to Jenny Davison’s sculpture of the Doors of Durin, from Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring. One of several projects featured in the poster by A. Smol and R. Power. Image copyright Jenny Davison 2013.

A Dramatic Reading: The Importance of Being Earnest

The Importance of Being EarnestThe English Department is hosting a dramatic reading of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest.

Wednesday, November 16
4:30 p.m.
Seton 404

All are welcome to attend or to participate (contact Dr. Diane Piccitto if you’d like to be assigned a part).

 

Grad School Info Session 2016

https://www.callcentrehelper.com/images/stories/2010/uni-ccm-185.jpgWednesday, October 19
4:30 – 5:30
Seton 532

Why go to grad school?
How do I choose a school?
How do I apply?
What are the funding options?

Students are invited to an informal information session about graduate school with Dr. Karen Macfarlane. This session is open to everyone (you don’t have to be in your final year!) so if you are even curious about what is involved in applying for graduate programs in the humanities, come along!

Attendance can count towards the new English Department Professionalization Co-curricular Credit.

RSVP
Please email Dr. Karen Macfarlane at karen.macfarlane@msvu.ca to let her know if you are planning to attend.