Author Archives: msvuenglish

About msvuenglish

Department of English, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Dr. Nathaniel Street’s profile on Mount homepage

Dr. Nathaniel Street

Dr. Nathaniel Street

The English Department is pleased to welcome Dr. Nathaniel Street to our faculty. Dr. Street is the new Co-ordinator of our Writing Minor program and teaches several of our Writing courses.

The Mount has published a profile of Dr. Street on the University homepage.  Take a look!

Read more about our Writing Minor.

 

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Faculty to present at 2017 Atlantic Teaching Showcase

Teaching award winner David Wilson will be sharing some of his best ideas at the 2017 Teaching Showcase, to be held at the Mount on Saturday, October 14. Professor Wilson will be presenting in what is known as the “Furious Fives” session — a quick series of five-minute talks packed with ideas to take away from the conference. David Wilson offers this summary of his talk:

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https://i0.wp.com/www.msvu.ca/site/media/msvu/davidwilson.JPG

David Wilson, recipient of the 2017 MSVU Part-time Teaching Award

Does your class often end with a fade to black?

Rather than merely telling students during the last 5 minutes of a class what will happen in the next one, a more effective teaching practice is showing them. This “Furious Five” session will quickly demonstrate tips on how to briefly preview (and promote) a topic during the closing moments of a class that bridges what students have just learned, so that they will be curious and look forward to learning more in the next class. The final five minutes of a class can serve as a memorable pivot point that keeps students motivated. The key to accomplishing this goal is to capture students’ attention. Moreover, the best way to make these connections between classes is by using a lively activity that encourages participation. Thus, attendees at this session can expect to be involved in the fun.

 

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The experiential learning opportunities offered by our department will be on display during the conference as well.  Dr. Anna Smol will be organizing a display that features the English Department’s many hands-on learning activities, from participation at the Atlantic Undergraduate English Conference, to part-time jobs as writing tutors and research assistants, to the many course-related activities that our students engage in.

David Wilson‘s talk will be given on Saturday, October 14 in a session scheduled from  4:25 to 4:50 in McCain 105.

Anna Smol‘s experiential learning display will be in the Rosaria Terrace from 11:30 to 1:30.

The Saturday Teaching Showcase conference is part of a three-day series of events. On Thursday night at 7 p.m. a public lecture by special guest and keynote speaker James Lang, author of Small Teaching and Cheating Lessons, will take place in the Rosaria Multipurpose Room. A workshop with Dr. Lang will be held on Friday morning before the Showcase takes place on Saturday.  For details, including the schedule, see more information here.

 

Alan Syliboy visit, October 10

The English Department is pleased to present Alan Syliboy, author and illustrator of The Thundermaker. Dr. Syliboy is an internationally renowned Mi’kmaw painter, sculptor, filmmaker, musician, and social justice activist.

Tuesday, October 10
Noon
MSVU Aboriginal Student Centre

You can take a look at Syliboy’s art and listen to his music on his website: alansyliboy.ca, which also links to his Facebook page. You can also find him on Twitter, @AlanSyliboy, where you can see a daily sample of his artwork.  This image, posted on October 3, comes from his drum series:

Alan Syliboy, drum series. posted on Oct. 3, 2017 @AlanSyliboy

Drum Series, from @AlanSyliboy, posted October 3, 2017.

 

 

Dr Fraser to speak at Research Remixed

Dr. Graham Fraser will be one of the speakers at the Mount’s annual Research Remixed event on Tuesday, October 3rd. His talk is scheduled for 11:15 in the Multi-Purpose Room in Rosaria.  Here’s a preview of what he’ll be talking about:

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Virginia Woolf, Spectro-Modernism, and the Afterlife of Things

Dr. Graham Fraser
Tuesday, October 3, 11:15 a.m.
Multi-Purpose Room, Rosaria

“Think of a kitchen table, when you’re not there” challenges Andrew Ramsay in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, distilling his father’s empiricist philosophy. Woolf’s writings are fascinated by the world of objects removed from human perception or context – objects that are abandoned, disused, broken. Yet Woolf’s own attention to inanimate (yet lively) objects is so exquisite that Michel Serres can write that in her work, “inanimate objects have a soul.” This presentation will discuss how my work traces the progress of these inanimate souls from their domestic lives in human service, through their abandonment and decay, and finally into their afterlives as ghostly, illegible debris.

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Dr. Graham Fraser

Dr. Graham Fraser

You can read more about Dr. Fraser’s research here.

Research Remixed brings together researchers from across the university who present their work in short talks or posters. The event starts at 9 a.m. and goes until 1 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room in Rosaria.  All are welcome to drop in during the day.  You can download the full Research Remixed schedule here.

 

 

Dr Green on war and peace in art

Community Stories of War and Peace public lecture series

Dr. Reina Green, along with local artist Jessica L. Wiebe, will be speaking about representations of war and peace in art on Friday, September 29, at 1:30 in the Keshen Goodman Library.  Her talk is part of a series of Friday presentations organized by the Mount Network for Community-Engaged Research on War (NCERW) in collaboration with other community groups.

Dr. Reina Green

Dr. Reina Green

You can read more about Dr. Green’s research here.

The Network for Community-Engaged Research on War is interested in “exploring what stories of war and peace are being told, identifying which stories are more visible and which are marginalized, and understanding how war affects us in diverse and overlapping ways.”

All of the talks take place from 1:30 – 2:30 in the Keshen Goodman Public Library, 330 Lacewood Drive, Halifax. Other topics to be presented include military families, peace perspectives, refugee experiences, and the Halifax Explosion. For more details about future talks, please see the Community Stories poster [pdf 3.9 MB].

keshen-sponsors

 

Meet & Greet Monday Sept. 25

Please join us for the Mount English Meet and Greet!

  • Discover who we are and what we do.
  • Meet other English and Writing students.
  • Get to know the professors.
  • Learn about our programs.
  • Meet special guest, El Jones, poet, activist, and Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies.
  • Hear about upcoming events.

Refreshments will be served.

Current students and alumnae are invited!

Monday, September 25
4:30 – 6:00
Seton 404

 

Congratulations to our high school essay contest winners!

This year, our Department organized a Grade 11 and 12 English Essay Writing Competition, and now we are pleased to announce the results.

Jack Farrell, winner of the 2017 High School Essay Writing Competition

Jack Farrell, winner of the 2017 MSVU English Essay Writing Competition, with English Department Chair Dr. Reina Green (left), and Dr. Janet Friesen (right), Halifax Grammar School

First prize:

Jack Farrell, Halifax Grammar School, “Creon as a Warning of Autocracy”

Honourable Mention:

Ciara Harris, J.L. Ilsley High School, “Contrasting Literary Styles in Fahrenheit 451 and Animal Farm

Ruining Zhang, Sacred Heart School of Halifax, “Sweet Potato Nostalgia”

Evelyn Cormier, Halifax West High School, “The Birth and Destruction of Honour”

Jack Farrell won an iPad Mini as the first prize, while the writers who received an honourable mention were awarded gift certificates to a local bookstore.

The Mount English Department is pleased to highlight the work of young writers, from high school through university and beyond. We look forward to seeing participating students, their parents, and teachers at a reception in the fall.


English at the Mount

Our English courses feature small classes where students have plenty of opportunities to write with feedback from their professors, while our unique Writing Minor focuses not only on creative writing, but also on rhetoric, editing, and writing in various genres.

 

 

Two English faculty honoured at Convocation

David Wilson receiving teaching award, Convocation 2017

David Wilson received the MSVU Alumnae Part-time Teaching Award

Congratulations to David Wilson, who received the MSVU Alumnae Part-time Teaching Award at Convocation in May. An instructor in both our English and Writing programs, he was commended for his engaging style and for his innovative online courses. You can see one of the videos he developed for his online ENGL 1171 course here.

 

Susan Drain Convocation 2017

Dr. Susan Drain was awarded the rank of Professor Emerita at Convocation

At the same Convocation, Dr. Susan Drain, who retired last December, was awarded the rank of Professor Emerita. Dr. Drain has served in many positions in her career, such as the English Department Writing Co-ordinator, Department Chair, Secretary of Senate, Faculty Association executive — to name only a few. She is also a multiple teaching award winner, including the prestigious 3M Teaching Fellowship (the only Mount faculty to hold that distinction). Her current research project is Percy’s War, a daily blog about the experiences of a Canadian gunner in WWI.

Congratulations to both David and Susan!

Photos from the Mount Flickr album

Congratulations English grads 2017

It was a lovely spring day for the 2017 B.A. convocation on Friday, May 19th. Congratulations to our newest English alumni.

English grads and faculty 2017

We managed to gather almost all of the English grads for this photo, along with attending faculty. From left to right, Dr. Reina Green, Dr. Karen Macfarlane. Back row: David Wilson, Luke Hammond, Kevin Smith, Andrew Potter, Ryan Terry, Dr. Anna Smol. Front, left to right: Cassadie Day, Sarah Vallis, Allyson Roussy, Gavin Rollins, Dr. Diane Piccitto, Dr. Susan Drain.

Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Allyson K. Roussy (with first-class honours)

Sarah K. Vallis (with first-class honours)

Bachelor of Arts (Major)

Duaa Chamsi Basha

Cassadie F. Day

Luke P. Hammond

Michael Luciano

Andrew Potter

Gavin L. Rollins

Ryan K. Terry

Bachelor of Arts (Combined Major)

Kevin Smith (English and History)

Congratulations also to Professor David Wilson, who received the MSVU Part-Time Teaching Award and to Dr. Susan Drain, who was awarded the rank of Professor Emerita.

Graduates, please keep in touch! If you haven’t already, please join the English Society Facebook group or follow us on Twitter or Instagram to keep up with our activities. Or subscribe for email notifications from this blog (scroll down on this page to find the subscription form). However you do it, let us know where your future adventures take you!

Watch this blog for more convocation pictures in the days ahead.

Places to Write: Lucky Penny

There are still a few more days in the term to finish off those essays! Here is the last in the series on Places to Write by our media assistant, Kyle Cross.

Places to Write: Time Travel in Lucky Penny Coffee Co.
by Kyle Cross

Places to Write: Lucky Penny Coffee Co.Located at 6440 Quinpool Road, Lucky Penny Coffee Co. is a small coffee shop with an immensely atmospheric quality that you won’t find anywhere else in Halifax. Everything about this café radiates ‘history’; everything sends you back to the past without ever leaving the present. It is, in many ways, like a brand new antique.

The dessert plates and saucers recall a bygone era. In fact, as one staff member tells me, every dish is vintage. Even the pennies sitting in a pool of water with real (yes, REAL) flowers take you back in time; they are, like the saucer pictured above, out of circulation and thus a thing of the past.

The stained mahogany tables and the antique dishes make me feel like I’m at Le Dôme Café or La Rotonde in Montparnasse, two historic literary cafés that were frequented by such writers as Gertrude Stein and Ernest Hemingway. Lucky Penny’s thick, wooden antique tables, along with its vintage mahogany decorum, give the café this Modernist salon-like atmosphere. The crowd at Lucky Penny also tends to consist of students of the Arts, as a staff member tells me, and, as I glance at others around me, I see a woman reading a novel by Atwood, another reading a book of poetry, and a man reading Kafka. I get the feeling that I’m in Paris, but I am, of course, sitting in a café on Quinpool Road. Needless to say, it is a great place to read, write, create stories, eat scrumptious desserts, and drink fine coffee.

Lucky Penny Coffee Co. interiorInstead of cheap over-priced drinks, Lucky Penny serves heavenly coffee. Do try Lucky Penny’s Black Honey brew, a medium blend roasted locally in Berwick, Nova Scotia. The coffee is a blend of the global and the local. Its beans are grown in Costa Rica and roasted in Berwick. Lucky Penny might be described as an establishment of glocalization, what with the locally roasted yet foreign coffee beans and the vintage 20th-century, European-style decor.

Lucky Penny Coffee CoLucky Penny is very much a fusion of the past and the present. The banner for Queen Elizabeth High School, which was shut down in 2007, also creeps up on and invades the present. Like the pennies, the Queen Elizabeth banner is a thing from the past, although it does sport the name of the current reigning queen.

The interpenetration of past and present, along with the interplay of global and local culture, makes Lucky Penny a great place for creative intellectuals to let their imaginations run free.

(Please note that Kyle has no personal or professional affiliations with the places he writes about).